Photos: Skateboard art highlights the macabre and mysterious

Lindsay Nohl (right) and Jenny Bookler work with a waterslide decal at Light Grey Art Lab in Minneapolis, on October 6, 2014. Nikki Tundel / MPR News

At Light Grey Art Lab, gallery shows are often collaborative group projects. The four-member team develops a show concept, then invites designers from around the world to submit their artistic interpretations.

Their upcoming show, Skate or Die, is inspired by the dark aesthetic of the skateboard subculture. Designs from 60 artists will be displayed on Canadian Maple skateboard decks.

Layers of varnish are applied to art-covered skateboard decks. Nikki Tundel / MPR News
Chris Hajny sprays boards with polyurethane varnish outside Light Grey Art Lab. Nikki Tundel / MPR News
Hajny waterproofs the wooden works of art so they can be used as actual skateboards. Nikki Tundel / MPR News
Hajny and Nohl prepare 60 skateboard decks for the art show. Nikki Tundel / MPR News
Working late into the evening, Francesca Buchko looks over a finished board. Nikki Tundel / MPR News
Once waterslide decals are wet, the backing paper can be pulled off and the ink will be transferred to the blank skateboard. Nikki Tundel / MPR News
Jenny Bookler (left) and Lindsay Nohl transfer an image to a Canadian Maple 7-ply skateboard deck. Nikki Tundel / MPR News
Digital images are transferred to waterslide decals, like this one. The process works much like that of temporary tattoos. The decal is submerged in water. It can then be adhered to another surface -- in this case, a blank skateboard. Nikki Tundel / MPR News
Chris Hajny (right) shows finished skateboards to Jared Tuttle, an artist participating in the show. Nikki Tundel / MPR News
Prints wait to be applied to blank skateboards. Nikki Tundel / MPR News